outdated bathroom mirror glow up

HELLLLLLOOOOOOO, MISS THANG

As well documented, I'm a fan of taking the route entitled "FREE, OR VERY CLOSE TO FREE, HOME IMPROVEMENT." It's been like this for all the years of homeownership, and regardless of any future budget size decisions, I think it will remain so. It's the most fun, at least for us Cisneros's over here.

So imagine my extreme delight when Chad told me that we were going to DO SOMETHING with the old, came-with-the-house mirror that *I* had stored on *his* work bench in the garage. I told him, "GREAT! I know exactly what we should do: make a gigantic mirror for the downstairs hallway!" Desperate to get it away from his workspace, he said, "sure!" GOOD HUSBAND.

It's one of these mirrors, the type we have all across America in every single new build:



So sad. So much potential. 

This gigantic-mirror-desire-for-our-downstairs-hallway sprung out of what other than... perusing Anthropologie and salivating over their GIGANTIC GORGEOUS FLOOR MIRRORS. That particular mirror set is JUST TOO GOOD. So gorgeous. So pricey. But I completely understand why! Do you know how much joy that would bring a human being to walk by everyday? Definitely worth it. 

However, if you just so happen to have a 5x3' mirror lying around on your husband's work bench, and could envision adding an additional foot to the top and bottom to make it similar proportions to Anthro's, then hey my friend, you are in luck.

Alright! So I was bad and hardly took any pictures of us making this, but here was the gist:

1. We got a super rough, large piece of plywood (OSB? Proper name?) to glue the mirror to, and then at the bottom, Chad used teensy, tiny screws to act as a sort of shelf for the mirror. Heaven forbid it should slide down, it would be held up by the tiny screws, and held BACK by the upper part of the frame.

2. Once that dried, Chad cut a piece of sanded plywood into the 4 sides of the frame. The frame exceeds the original piece of plywood, which ultimately hides it. 


3. I then black washed it - who knew that was a thing? I mixed equal parts black paint with water. I wanted the grain to show through, but didn't want a chestnut-type vibe, which is all the stain we had. I was very happy with the result.

4. Then, in order to ensure it would stay on the wall despite 3 kids, a large dog and us walking by it thousand of times (SUPER high traffic area), we decided it was best to screw it straight into the wall. THAT THANG AIN'T GOIN' NO WHERE. 


STOKED. It's 100% what I had envisioned in that space from the second we walked through the house. Isn't it funny how your VERY FIRST instinct on how to decorate a space is the RIGHT way to do it? There have been soooooo many instances where I have a vision, execute said vision, then because I change my mind all the time, think it would be better to rearrange - without fail, I always end up switching it back to what I had initially envisioned. It makes me feel great about going with my gut!

Wahoooooooooo for a project that PACKS A SERIOUS PUNCH. YASSSSS.



gigantic walls = gigantic need to be filled


(THE UNSTYLED-NESS OF THESE PILLOWS IS DRIVING ME A BIT NUTS. JUST HAD TO SAY THAT. BUT GUESS WHAT, MAMA'S GOT NO TIME TO GO PLACE 'EM PERFECTLY - SO OH WELL!)

Folks!!! True to form, my thoughts for the GIGANTIC walls that make up our entryway, living room and dining room were, as a surprise to no one, GIGANTIC. But guess what comes with GIGANTIC thoughts for GIGANTIC walls.

GIGANTIC CONTRACTOR BIDS.

So, again true to form, we decided to chuck the idea of hiring someone to put up some board and batten and also to NOT go with the 16+' bookcases full of glorious lighting, and instead went for something a little less... expensive. SO much less expensive, in fact, that it was FREE.


That's a GIGANTIC YES to me over here, Nicole El-Cheapo Cisneros! WIN.

I walked out into the garage one day, sick of staring at the giant greyish white-ish walls in that front, dominant room - I laid down a humongous piece of smooth plywood we just happened to have out there (leftover from the phase 1 kitchen backsplash project), then opened up the quart-or-so of paint we had left over from painting the playroom a deep green.

I started painting the bottom third of the plywood, then added some white to the paint that was left. About 20 minutes later, I ombre'd another third of the plywood, then repeated the process another 20 minutes later. Chad then screwed the entire 9x4' of my new art to the wall, created a frame made out of moulding to it, and

PRESTO!

SOMETHING TO FILL OUR GIGANTIC WALL!!!!!!

(EDITING TIME ON THIS HERE PIC = ZERO. AS EVIDENCED BY THE STATE OF THE ROOM AS WELL BAHA! AND IN THIS PIC, IT LOOKS PEWNY (PUNY?). THAT'S WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU DON'T PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR ANGLES.)

So we kept it like that for months and months - my green beauty just standing by herself. Then out of no where I had this intense itch to add to it - either it was time for us to take the green beaut off the wall and DIY ourselves some 16' bookcases or we needed to add some complimentary art to ol' greenie.

(IN PROGRESS COMPLIMENTARY ART - HELLO YES.)

(AND THEN FOR THE 3 ART PIECES TO LOOK NOT LOST ON THE HUGE WALL, I MADE THIS FREE PICTURE LEDGE THANKS TO ANGELA ROSE'S TUTORIAL.  CAN YOU EVEN BELIEVE THIS WAS ALL FREE? THIS SHELF IS 10' LONG!)

Again TRUE TO FORM, I went for the cheap option - walked back into the garage and created some more art! This time from leftover bulletin boards we had out there. I FREAKING LOVE IT.

Still not over the whole experience; a little creativity and we no longer have a large, white, empty wall AND we never shelled out the 7 billion dollars for the contractors. I'm calling that a win for the time being!